Writer | Marketer | Creative

Kennetic Expression

A lively take on creativity, business, and life.

I Wrote Every Day for 3 Months & This Is What Happened

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Bottom line: It takes more than 3 months to really go anywhere or do anything. Thankfully, I knew this going in, and I'm rather pleased with my results thus far.

As a quick overview, I started writing in January 2015, and after a bit of early (albeit undeserved) success with Elite Daily, I got a little cocky.

I was writing every few days, maybe, and it would take me two weeks to finish one article. But I thought I was good because I hadn't been rejected yet.

I started creating small amounts of content for Text Request in March, and for Lifehack in June. Over time, I would start doing a little more here and there. By the end of the year, I'd written/published ~110 articles totaling roughly 90,000 words.

At this point, I'd done enough to get my feet wet, but not enough to dive into the deep end. So I made it my year-long project to publish 100,000 words (not including Text Request content).

I started publishing a piece every two or three days, but by the end of January I knew I desperately needed to be creating and posting every day. All of my stats across the board have been and still are abysmal, relative to any successful blog or influencer, but here's what I've seen happen since I decided to write and post every day.

From the end of January, my website traffic has grown ~40% month over month. My blog following has grown about 50% overall. My Instagram account has gone from non-existent to ~5,000 followers.

I've about doubled the number of advocates for my work (which is incredible, and I'm so thankful for each of you). And I've started getting emails from people reaching out for help, promotions, features, etc.

The big thing here is that writing and posting every day has started to make me visible, which is crucial to being recognized for anything.

There's a handful of other positives, too. I started writing every day largely because I wanted to get better, and I feel like that's happening. Maybe I'm wrong. You're the reader, so you can tell me.

It's also steadily easier to write every day. I've cultivated good habits in these last 3 months. Anywhere I see a success story, there's the same command: develop the right habits. I'm in a good place with that, and I'm excited to see what I'll be able to do over the next 3 months.

These last 3 months have also made the process of creating easier. My ability to take any ol' idea and expound upon it is growing, which will be key for what I want to do moving forward.

It's also made the ideation process easier. Coming up with something to write about is getting easier and easier the more I do it. (If you're just beginning, take note: It gets better.)

We always want more than we have or than we've accomplished. That certainly applies here, too. But despite my struggle with patience, I'm glad to see things progressing like this.

I do believe I'll have to change things up, though. I'm starting to get bored with just doing the same thing every day, which means my followers - you guys - must be bored as well, or at least on the cusp.

I plan to start making some (subjectively) fun, more interactive changes. I welcome recommendations! So far I've got pulling crowd-sourced ideas out of a hat for writing prompts (thank you to Will for the idea, and to everyone else who's contributed their thoughts).

I also want to start doing something to the effect of 10-second book reviews, where I take a book I've read, and in a 10-second video tell you whether I'd recommend it and why. Simple photojournalism has also come to mind.

3 months, in this case, is not enough to change a life. But I have seen growth, and I have been getting better. Now, I'll have to keep getting better. Since I have a good base in habits and advocates, this is the time I need to start ramping things up.

I'm looking forward to the next 3 months, and I thank you for joining me!